Origami News

News: Watch a Piece of Paper Get Destroyed with 7 Folds

It's almost impossible to fold a piece of paper in half more than seven times under normal circumstances. Sure, the guys on MythBusters managed to fold a piece of paper eleven times, but they used a sheet of paper the size of a football field and needed the help of a forklift and steamroller to get the job done.

News: Origami X-Ray Skeletons of Endangered Animals

The ancient craft of origami gets an update in Oritsunagumono, where environmentalism meets photoelectricity for the first time. Its name translates into "things folded and connected," and its agenda aims to bring awareness of the environmental impact of pollution to native marine wildlife in Japan's coastal waterways.

News: Massive Origami Boat Floats Down the Thames

Everybody has some kind of calling in life and it looks like artist Frank Bölter's is the construction of life-sized origami boats. He's done it before, and he's at it again. His latest creation recently set sail on the Thames as a part of London's Drift10 art exhibition.

News: Microscopic Origami

Wowee, origami artist Mui-Ling Teh has the skills of a DaVinci Robot. To view more of her work, check out her artist profile on Red Bubble. Inspired? Scroll all the way down for a demonstration on the folding of a teeny, tiny origami crane.

News: Larger Than Life Origami Boat

Artist Frank Bölter created a life-sized origami boat to sail up the Elbe. The boat cost £110 to construct back in '97 (today's conversion rate would put that at $175). The boat is 30 feet long, and weighs 55 pounds. It took 2 hours to construct, using a 170 square meter sheet of paper.

News: Star Wars Moneygami

Nerd out with Won Park's Star Wars/Star Trek dollar-gami. More images on DVice. Fold your own moneygami on WonderHowTo, or better yet, scroll all the way down to learn how to make your own origami Star Wars X-Wing Fighter from Fold Something.

News: Make a 471 piece origami swan

For the (anal) artist among us. This tutorial requires only 15 sheets of paper and scissors. Technically, because of the cutting of the paper, this swan is kirigami, not origami. That said, assembling 471 paper triangles into this beautiful swan is the work of angels.

Next Page
Prev Page